Tag Archives: Windsor Regional Hospital

Funding “reform” has CEOs chasing hospital mergers

In a perfect world hospitals would be publicly funded to meet the health needs of their communities. That would be it.

When the government started talking about funding reform, the thinking was that at last we would be moving closer to a rational system of allocation.

What we got instead was a hybrid of global funding, competition, and a funding formula that was supposed to take into consideration both existing usage and local demographics. Layered on top is a base funding freeze to at least 2018. Money has always been a driver in the health system, but suddenly it appears to be driving everything.

The evidence suggests that the complex and confusing system of funding allocation is creating new inequities that may be even worse than the ad hoc system of the past.

The South Bruce Grey Health Centre, for example, has argued to the South West LHIN that they are being penalized for efficiently combining the resources of four small rural hospitals. The Scarborough Hospital and the Rouge Valley Health System have made it clear that the complex demographic needs of their two communities are not being recognized in their base funding allocation.

What the new funding system appears to be doing is driving a new wave of costly and disruptive hospital mergers. You can’t blame the hospitals for seeking such mergers because they are simply acknowledging the new rules of the game set by the province. In this new world bigger gets more clout gets more funding.

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Squeaky Wheels: Are more Ontario hospital CEOs likely to publicly air their grievances?

It makes us wonder why so few hospital CEOs are willing to publicly go to bat for their institutions. It’s true that in the past public advocacy was not always met with great appreciation at Queen’s Park, which has the power to take over a hospital and deal with sticky problems in their own way. Joe De Mora’s time at the Kingston General Hospital certainly comes to mind.

With hospitals having experienced their first year of a base funding freeze, and with perhaps a second lurking in tomorrow’s provincial budget, CEOs are going to be under a lot of pressure by communities reluctant to give up health services – especially in tough economic times. With costs rising and increased demand on their doorstep, a freeze represents a significant real cut to hospitals. High profile job losses at Ontario hospitals are already part of the landscape. The question is, what will year two of this look like and who will stick their head out to say something?

While some CEOs are parroting the Queen’s Park line about restructuring, others are starting to get some traction on their issues.

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Secrets: Responsibility for diluted chemo cocktails may be tied up in secret contract

Who is responsible for the unexpectedly diluted chemotherapy cocktail that more than a 1,000 cancer patients received since February 2012? And will we ever know when aspects of the story are being treated as safely guarded secrets?

The issue has been making headlines this week with fingers pointing in all directions.

At least two of the hospitals involved have now taken back the preparation of the drug cocktail – both Durham Region’s Lakeridge Health and the Windsor Regional Hospital have said they are able to prepare it themselves.

London Health Sciences also says they have the capacity to prepare the drugs internally, but LHSC Vice-President Tony LaRocca told the London Free Press that they contract out the work because it is “more practical and efficient.”

Did he really say that with a straight face, especially after knowing the questions London patients and their families must now have?

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Plan to radically remake Windsor hospitals

The Windsor Star suggests today that the city is likely to be reduced to one acute care hospital. Hotel Dieu and Windsor Regional have agreed to a partnership that will see all acute services delivered from the Regional. Hotel Dieu would be reduced to the status of an urgent care centre and primarily work on outpatient services. There will be no inpatient beds.

Hotel-Dieu will manage all non-acute programs and services currently offered by Windsor at its west-side Tayfour campus according to the newspaper.

It is interesting that the hospital is quick to note that this is not a hospital merger.

Eventually the two hospitals will be replaced by a large mega hospital. No worries about money when it comes to bricks and mortar. In Ontario this appears to be a bottomless supply.

Details of the proposal have been already sent to the LHIN and the province, which makes us question where the public fits into this scenario? Aren’t integration proposals supposed to show evidence of stakeholder consultation first? Yet clearly this announcement is coming as a big surprise.

In Brief: Hospital cuts as transfers, Pupatello’s ego gets the better of her

Pop quiz: who wrote this: “Our government expects – as do health care providers – that this change will exacerbate the health conditions of patients with chronic conditions and those who are at risk of developing such conditions. In addition, given preventative care is less costly that emergency or acute care treatment, your policy represents a significant download to provinces and especially Ontario, where the vast majority of refugee claimants reside.” If you guessed Ontario Health Minister Deb Matthews, you’d be correct. Matthews’ wrote Federal Citizenship and Immigration Minister Jason Kenney in December over the impact of cuts to the Interim Federal Health Program for refugees. Tomorrow (Wednesday) opponents of the federal cuts will be meeting outside of Deb Matthews’ downtown Toronto office to ask Ontario to have a heart and provide stop-gap coverage for these disenfranchised refugees left without coverage. Demo starts at 11:30 am near Bay and Wellesley Streets in Toronto.

Windsor Regional Hospital is closing its long-standing Acute Injuries Rehabilitation and Evaluation Centre after the facility lost $300,000 last year. Once a revenue-generator for the hospital, the centre provides assessment and treatment services to people injured in automobile accidents or on the job. Revenues came from WSIB and other private insurance providers. The hospital claims two other private centres have meant that this insurance work done by the hospital has “dried up.” Curiously Windsor lawyer Suzanne Dajczak told the CBC that the closure would mean costs would shift to the patients. “When you’re injured, you’re under stress, finances generally are cut – in the cases that I see, substantially. They usually come when they’re denied and, yes, they’re going to struggle, and it’s going to be more difficult for injured workers” (Emphasis added). Is Ms. Dajczak suggesting that these private clinics may be less supportive of injured worker claims than the public hospital?

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50 Shades leading Windsor baby boom — Musyj

We don’t quite know what to make of this one.

Our most quotable of hospital CEOs is now saying that the erotic bestseller 50 Shades of Grey may be responsible for a mini baby boom in Windsor, Ontario.

Windsor Regional Hospital CEO David Musyj has been all over the media recently after speculating a 30 per cent jump in births over a six-day period may have something to do with the publishing nine months earlier of E. L. James’ steamy novel.

“If you back up the calendar, the book of 50 Shades of Grey was released worldwide and in Canada earlier this year,” he told the media. “There is talk around the hospital that it is possible that the release of that book has something to do with the increase in births.”

Our national broadcaster – the CBC — took this story very seriously, consulting a sexuality professor and a demographer. The professor suggests Musyj could be right while the demographer is more cautious given there is an overall “echo effect” – the children of boomers are now having kids of their own.

Of course, the question is, why only in Windsor? Are women there just particularly fast readers and subsequently ahead of the trend?  Is 50 Shades of Grey doing for the Windsor library’s circulation what the book is doing for that of its readers?

Musyj also suggests that blackouts and big collective agreements may also spur mini-baby booms at his hospital.

You might say the results are a secondary labour movement.

Hospitals: Let’s get the cuts out in the open

When faced with underfunding, should hospital CEOs make clear the consequences, or should they quietly find ways to cut services that may be less noticeable to the public?

For the first time since the Harris government, the McGuinty government has frozen base funding for hospitals. In addition it has introduced a new funding formula that is having negative repercussions for some.

We have always argued that having a funding formula makes sense, but such a formula should be grandfathered in so that hospitals on the losing end of the equation are not adversely affected. There are also questions about whether the formula itself is fair, some arguing that existing patterns of use are partly determined by where existing services are, as opposed to where services should be.

The net result of these changes in funding is hospitals are faced with particularly difficult choices this year.

Many choose to quietly go about their chopping, limiting input to board and management. Others talk publicly about consequences leaving the broader community an opening to debate what should take place.

The latest to talk about consequences is David Musyj, CEO of the Windsor Regional Hospital. Last week Musyj warned of possible layoffs and cuts to services, such as endoscopy and ultrasound – both he says are offered at private clinics in his community.

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